Winter wind down

There’s been no discernable changes to Liz’s white oak or my plum tree since last month  so I’m not doing a separate post about them this month.  Thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting Tree following this year, and if she continues we’ll be taking part again next year.

I looked round a rather forlorn plot yesterday morning, which was my first visit since last Saturday.  There had been rain overnight so it was soggy, and seeing as it was chilly as well I didn’t linger for long.  I left Foxy nestling in the ivy under the rose Pretty Lady and headed home for tea and biscuits.  He was given to me by one of the other plot holders soon after I took mine on.

With little to do, or can be done, at this time of year I’m now starting my winter wind down.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, November 2020

Liz – Last Sunday was a glorious, sunny day here in Lexington, Kentucky so Mary, my daughter, suggested that we go to the park where my white oak is.

As I have a bad back at present I sat on a bench whilst she took my two dogs, Dulcie and Sophie, for a walk.

As you can see the oak tree leaves are changing colour and dropping, which isn’t surprising seeing as it’s now late autumn.

 

After a winter rest I’m hoping that the tree will have recovered from the fungal disease that badly affected it earlier this year.

Mike –  The plum tree is now bare having dropped almost all of the leaves.   Close up you can see just how tangled it all is.

 

Although it didn’t fruit this year it does most years bearing lots of small yellow plums.  It wasn’t pruned much, if at all, when the plot was in use, and which is now untended. I wonder what will happen to this tree as and when someone takes the plot on.

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for continuing to host Tree following. If you want to know more about this please click on the link shown over on the right-hand side.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

The two asters,…

or Michaelmas daisies if you prefer, I have are the last plants to flower at this time of year.

I’ve had the blue ones for almost as long as I’ve had the plot, and were given to me in a large pot.  They’ve certainly spread since I planted them out and now form a large clump between the dogwood and the roadway where they always do well.

I was given these white ones some years ago by George, a one-time plot neighbour who much preferred growing flowers.  This smaller clump has masses of tiny white flowers which I call Twinkling Stars.

These have done well since I moved them from the middle of the plot, where it’s prone to water-logging in wet winters, to the top edge next to the roadway.

Please note that I’m not doing a Tree following post this month as both Liz’s white oak over in Lexington, Kentucky and the plum tree have shown no discernible changes since last month’s post.

Take care, and have a good week!

Tree following, September 2020

 

Liz –  My White Oak which I’m tree following here in Lexington, Kentucky shows little change since last month but it’s good to see that it still has plenty of green leaves.

There’s also more new growth low down on the trunk which is hopefully a good sign.

 

 

 

     

 

Mike – The Plum tree I’m following likewise shows very little change apart from more leaves changing colour from green to yellow.

I noticed these interesting patterned leaves when I took a close look.

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for continuing to host Tree following. If you want to know more about this please click on the link shown over on the right-hand side.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, August 2020

Liz –   Further to last month I’m pleased to see that my White Oak, here in Lexington Kentucky, still has plenty of green leaves on it.  It’s also good to see that some new leaves have appeared low down on the trunk.

 

Hopefully this is an indication that the measures I took are beginning to work and the tree will fully recover.

Mike – Here in Harrow, London the leaves of the the Plum Tree I’m following are already starting to change colour, from green to yellow, and die back.

I’m not surprised to see this given the lack of rain throughout the spring and summer, along with periods of very warm weather such as this week when temperatures have been up to 35 C/ 95 F for several days.

Our thanks, to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for continuing to host Tree following. If you want to know more about this please click on the link shown over on the right-hand side.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, July 2020

Liz – Sadly my White Oak here in Lexington, Kentucky is suffering badly from the fungal disease anthracnose.

As recommended I’ve put two bags of shredded bark mulch around the base leaving a small, two inch, gap between this and the tree to allow it to breathe.

I’ve also pruned as much of the diseased leaves as I could reach, which have been bagged then disposed of and not composted.

 

 

Hopefully the tree will limp through the rest of the year, even though there is little good looking greenery left, and will regenerate next year.

 

 

 

 

Mike – Following my comments last month I’ve had another good look and can see no fruit on the Plum tree so I think that I was right about most of the blossom being blown off before it could form.

 

 

 

 

However walking round the tree I did find these three plums on the ground.  Normally the ground all around the tree would be covered with these but I’ll be surprised if I find any more.  The biggest of these is about the colour and size they  generally are.

 

 

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting Tree following.  If you want to know more about it then please click on the link over on the right-hand side.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, May 2020

Liz –  Here in Lexington, Kentucky the weather has been like a roller-coaster over the past few weeks. I took these pictures of the White Oak early this month which show hopeful green leaves and young, shriveled brown ones nipped in the bud by frost.

   

Mike – The Plum tree is now in full leaf, and it’s worth noting how the leaves cover it down to the ground.   The new leaves start off a reddish-brown before changing to green.

 

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting Tree following. If you want to know what it’s all about, and perhaps follow one as well, please click on the link over on the right-hand side.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, April 2020

Liz – here in Lexington, Kentucky my white oak now has leaf buds forming.  These trees are among the last to lose their leaves in the autumn and to grow new ones in the spring. The other picture, taken on a dull day, shows a blackbird (I think) perched on  a branch.

     

Mike –  The plum tree had sadly lost all it’s white blossom by the end of March. A closer look last week showed how quickly the new, small bright green leaves have grown.

 

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting Tree following. If you want to know what it’s all about , and perhaps follow one as well, please click on the link over on the right-hand side.

Take care, and have a good Easter weekend!

Tree following, March 2020

 

Liz – Here in Lexington. Kentucky spring has started with blue skies and sunshine some days.

In the park beyond my White Oak is an installation feature of metal structures which are part of a sensory garden.  They include bluebells that toll, a circular frame for climbing plants and fiddle-head ferns.

The pictures below show the tree’s white bark and the start of bud growth.

 

   

 

Mike –  For me among the best sights of spring are yellow daffodils and white tree blossom.

The Plum tree has been full of the latter over the past couple of weeks providing some much needed cheer on damp, dull days.

Seen against a blue sky the blossom is wonderful, and looked at closely I see that the buds are pink before they open.

 

   

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting Tree following. If you want to know what it’s all about, and perhaps follow one as well, please click on the link over on the right-hand side.

Have a good week!

Tree following, February 2020

Liz –  There’s been plenty of heavy rain and gale force winds, and even some snow, during the past month here in Lexington, Kentucky and there is little new to report about the White Oak.

I’m impressed, and relieved, that it’s withstood the winter weather as it has.

The pictures below show the trunk base, and water-droplets on the branch stems.

 

 

 

Mike – There has been similar weather here, but thankfully no snow.  A close look at the Plum shows the first signs of blossom buds starting to form.

It originally had two main stems but one split away near ground level some years ago.  The new growth where that happened has resulted in a mass of tangled stems.

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting Tree following.  If you want to know what it’s all about, and perhaps follow one as well, please click on the link over on the right-hand side.

Have a good weekend!