Tree following, November, 2021

Liz – The pictures of the seven son tree in my garden, here in Lexington, Kentucky, were taken at the end of October.

As you can see the pink sepals were still hanging in there, and leaves just beginning to turn yellow and starting to fall.

There is some interesting colouration and marks on the trunk ,  and there are still remnants of the original tree that died out a decade ago to be succeeded  this present one that unexpectedly sprung to life during 2015.

   

Mike – At last the leaves on the hornbeam in the local park are now changing colour and starting to drop and will form a golden-yellow carpet on the grass.

 

 

 

   

I’m looking forward seeing the tree leafless so that I can see the branches in more detail and how they form the distinctive fan shape.

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, please have a look at this tree following post.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

 

Tree following, October 2021

Liz – There was a lot of heavy rain during September here in Lexington, Kentucky.

That bought down most of the white blossom on the Seven-son flower tree in my garden, which the bees had been enjoying.

 

However October is when this tree really shines as the gorgeous pink sepals then show, which is such a lovely sight.

Mike – There’s still little visible change to the Hornbeam in the local park apart from a few  leaves now completely yellow and the branches ever more spotted with patches of green lichen.  Walking under the tree canopy and round it shows just how short the main trunk is before it separates into numerous branches as they head upwards.

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, please have a look at this tree following post.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, September 2021

Brief reports on both trees this month.

Liz – In my garden here in Lexington, Kentucky the Seven Son tree is finally beginning to bloom with clusters of flowers at the ends of the branches, which are attracting lots of bees.

Mike – It’s apparent even from a distance that the leaves on the Hornbeam in the local park are starting to go yellow.  Close up that’s confirmed, and I’d guess that’s more due to a lack of water rather than the time of year.

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for   hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, please have a look at this tree following post.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, August 2021

Liz – The Seven-son tree in my garden here in Lexington, Kentucky is about to burst into flower.

When it does it will take pride of place there through until September when even more surprises are in store.

 

Mike –  I was pleased to see that the leaves on the Hornbeam in my local park here in Harrow are looking better, and greener, than they did last month, when I guess that it was wind burn that caused the edges to crisp.

 

There is a lot of green lichen showing on the tree, which isn’t surprising given how much rain there has been lately.

 

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, please have a look at this tree following post.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, July 2021

 

Liz –  The Seven-son tree in my garden here in Lexington, Kentucky is now beginning to form flower buds at the ends of the limbs as shown in this photo, and they’ll bloom next month.

The other picture shows the now elongated leaves.

An interesting webpage about this tree is the Chicago Botanic Garden one.

 

Mike –  Walking through the park where the hornbeam is I was pleased to see that although the council had recently mowed most of the open grass areas they had left an area around the base of each tree unmown.

Close-up I was surprised to see some of the recently pristine leaves were already going brown and crisping around the edges, as seen in the photo below.  At this time of year I presume that’s due to either a lack of water or wind burn, or a combination of both.

 

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, have a look at this tree following post.

 

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, June 2021

Liz – these pictures of the Seven-Sons tree in my back garden, here in Lexington, Kentucky, were taken last week just before torrential rain started.

Because the blossom appears later in the year there’s been little apparent change since last month apart from it getting leafier.

 

The picture below also shows my Zephirine Drouhin thornless climbing rose that I thought I’d lost.

 

   

The yellow discolouration on the bark is of note, as are the marks which look like scaring or scoring.

Mike – Over the course of the past couple of months the Hornbeam in the local park has gone from looking golden-yellow to bright green and is now much darker, as seen  here.

The branches are only visible from close-to and  underneath as the fully grown leaves now cover the the tree.

 

 

   

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, please  have a look at this tree following post.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, May 2021

Liz – Here in Lexington, Kentucky the Seven-sons tree in my back garden looks to have recovered from the hard pruning it had earlier in the year,  which I mentioned last month.  Lots of new leaves have appeared which I hope means that there’ll be plenty of blossom in late summer.  There is also new growth where a branch was cut off.

     

Mike – Just a couple of photos from me this month to show how green the Hornbeam  in the park now looks compared to last month thanks to the fresh green leaves.

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, please have a look at this tree following post.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, April 2021

Liz – Here in Lexington, Kentucky I had asked the company that trims my trees to do so during February but following the ice storms they were overwhelmed with work clearing away downed trees and limbs so didn’t show up until late March.

   

The Seven-sons was one of the trees on the list to be attended to, and pruning should have been done in late winter before the buds form.  Hopefully having done the work this late won’t result in a dearth of blossom later on.

 

Mike – When I went and looked at the hornbeam last Sunday I found that, from a distance, the yellow, male catkins give the tree a golden glow.

For details, and pictures, of both the male and female catkins see this webpage.

 

Close-up as well as the catkins, new leaves are now beginning  to show.

 

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, please have a look at this tree following post.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, March 2021

Liz – last month saw three severe winter storms pass across the state leaving the Seven-sons tree in my back garden here in Lexington, Kentucky covered in ice and snow. 

Liz's Seven-sons, Mar'21 - 2

These two pictures were taken on February 18th, and in the lower one the power cable is being pressed down by branches. I had to clip these away to allow the cable to return to it’s usual level. I hope that spring now brings much better weather so that the tree will show signs of new growth by next month.

Mike – Tuesday was a bright and sunny day so I detoured on my way home from the plot to have a look at the Hornbeam. From a distance it doesn’t look as green as it did last month, and close up it was noticeable that the lichen had mostly faded to a greyish-green. Also visible, as you can see in the lower picture, are the yellow catkins starting to form.

Mike's Hornbeam, 9 Mar'21 - 1

Mike's Hornbeam, 9 Mar'21 - 3

By next month they should be bigger and I’ll be able to get better photos of them.

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps, join in, please have a look at this tree following post.

Take care, and have a good weekend!

Tree following, February 2021

Liz – I recently realized when looking at the Seven-son Flower tree in my back garden here in Lexington, Kentucky that it was in desperate need of a good prune.

I’d read up about pruning these trees that late winter is the best time so I made a limited effort.

I’ve tried to open up the tree by removing some of the crossed limbs.

The watering can hangs on the Skeleton tree that died about fifteen years ago. The other picture shows one of the pruned branches showing the peeled outer bark.

   

Mike – Looking at the Hornbeam I’m following from a distance it has a distinct green tinge, especially on the main trunk from a couple of feet above ground level spreading up through the tree.

Close to it’s apparent that the green is lichen that has covered much of the south and west facing parts of the tree.  Closer still and here’s the lichen in more detail. I know very little about lichens but will try to find out more about this particular one.

     

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, please have a look at this Tree following post.

Take care, and have a good week!

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