Tree following, February 2021

Liz – I recently realized when looking at the Seven-son Flower tree in my back garden here in Lexington, Kentucky that it was in desperate need of a good prune.

I’d read up about pruning these trees that late winter is the best time so I made a limited effort.

I’ve tried to open up the tree by removing some of the crossed limbs.

The watering can hangs on the Skeleton tree that died about fifteen years ago. The other picture shows one of the pruned branches showing the peeled outer bark.

   

Mike – Looking at the Hornbeam I’m following from a distance it has a distinct green tinge, especially on the main trunk from a couple of feet above ground level spreading up through the tree.

Close to it’s apparent that the green is lichen that has covered much of the south and west facing parts of the tree.  Closer still and here’s the lichen in more detail. I know very little about lichens but will try to find out more about this particular one.

     

Our thanks to Pat, The Squirrelbasket, for hosting tree following, and if you want to see what it’s all about, and perhaps join in, please have a look at this Tree following post.

Take care, and have a good week!

About Flighty

...allotmenteer, armchair gardener, blogger and sofa flying book buff.
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15 Responses to Tree following, February 2021

  1. Jo says:

    I’ve never heard of a Seven-son flower tree so I shall look forward to hearing more about it throughout the year. They say that lichen grows where there’s good air quality but I don’t know anything about it either.

    Like

  2. Liz says:

    Mike, what a surprise to see tree following from you on a Sunday. I love your hornbeam and like Jo (above) know very little about lichens. I’m glad I sent you a report on the seven son tree at the end of January on the one day when it was 50F/10C. Since then it’s been around or below freezing and on and off snow. Thanks for posting.

    Like

    • Flighty says:

      Liz I was undecided what to write about and as I’d already done the draft for this I thought I’d publish it. Thanks, nor me. It’s not been much, if any, better here.
      You’re welcome. xx

      Like

  3. julietwilson says:

    Lovely trees! I wish I knew more about lichens, they’re notoriously tricky to identify, but totally fascinating

    Juliet

    Like

  4. snowbird says:

    Two really interesting trees. Looking forward to hearing more about the lichen, our trees are covered in it, especially the old apple.xxx

    Like

  5. Funnily enough, I was noticing the lichen on the tree(s) I’m following! I wonder whether it’s more noticeable in the damp winter weather?

    Anyway, two great trees; well done on the pruning!

    Like

  6. Erika says:

    Good work with the pruning!

    Impressive lichen growth. The actual stem is hardly even visible under all that lichen.

    Like

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